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7 steps to starting your travels

Starting a trip can be pretty daunting. Not sure where to start, where to look first, what to book.

I get tons of questions from first time travelers or even just people unsure on where to start when booking the next big trip.

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I am going to make it short, sweet and simple.

Here are my 7 steps to getting that trip sorted.

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My first week in Bangkok

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Research & decide.

Where is it you want to go? What do you really want to see and do? Looking to work or just explore?

There are so many fabulous destinations and I know the feeling of wanting to go to them all, nevertheless, find out the places that fit your personal criteria and make a decision on where you will be going.

Maybe it’s exploring the wildlife in Africa, Interrailing around Europe or backpacking India. Driving around Vietnam, Camping in Australia or even skiing in Canada, the decision is yours.

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Find out if you need to apply for a visa or need to apply/pay for any entry requirments. Depending on where you are from and how long you want to stay in a country, there may be various costs. Take into consideration the time of year and weather seasons and conditions and current affairs around the world.

Book a flight

The first big step you should take is getting that first flight booked. This will really trigger the excitment and reality of you pursuing the trip.

Flights can be pretty pricey but once this is out the way, just focus on living costs/ spending money for the trip. I normally only book a flight and leave the rest for once I arrive.

Get saving

This is where you need to be strict. Start cutting down on unnecessary spending, think about the amount of money you are going to need. I never sacrificed too much to travel, I still wanted to live my life and do certain things however I barely drink, don’t buy myself new clothes and shoes and despite a rich life in the places I go and the people I meet, my outgoings are minimal. It’s all priorities, you just need to decide on yours.

If you know you are leaving to travel, you don’t need to be buying new shoes and clothes. Cut down the booze and put the money towards your trip.

I normally try and set a goal each month of how much I try and put away depending on my income. Work hard, play harder type thing..

Groups. Blogs. Pages.

If you are wanting to find out more about the places you are going too, If you’re traveling solo and want to chat to a few people, even if you want to read other peoples journeys, join the facebook groups and pages, read peoples blogs, just like you’re doing now! They are here to help.

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Vaccinations/Injections

Depending on the countries you’ll be visiting, you may need vaccinations. It can get pricey but check what you can get any on your local healthcare. For Asia I needed a Hep A booster, Rabies jab, Enchafilatus and Malaria tablets (Which I never even took). This did unfortunatley take a chunk out my travel funds including basic first aid bits.

Detatch yourself

If you really want that sense of freedom, you really want to get lost in the that real travel vibe, detach yourself from a lot of things. Slower the better but get rid of that phone contract, don’t have constant outgoings with the bank. Don’t attatch yourself to un-needed contracts, or even relationships. Be prepared to not have too many contracts or unnecesary bits. Certain friendships will fade and certain feelings may fizzle out, this is totally normal.

I ended my phone contract as soon as I could and stopped any direct debits for whatever I had.

Final preparations

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This is it. We are getting close now. Checked your healthcare, got any prescriptions, any visas needed beforehand? Got any copies of passports, important information? Got your camera sorted, currency changed? Any perticular equiptment you may need?

Think about the last people you need to catch up with, the last places you want to eat out and don’t hesitate to do everything you know you will miss.

Get ready for the adventure of a lifetime.

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The transition. Asia – Australia Part 1; Before I leave

Before I leave.

HOLY MOLY. Here I am, 6 months later on my last few days in Asia before Australia.

  What a whirlwind of emotions right now. Gutted to leave Asia. Excited to see Australia. Strange to be further away from home but closer to a more westernised and civilised lifestyle. It’s an odd subject I really don’t hear many people talking about but a journey a lot of us make.

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It’s a major adaptation. We’re used to moving countries, learning new currencies and blagging our way through backpacking crazy places but this is different.

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Trying street food in Penang, Malaysia pre thunderstorm.

Heading to Australia after traveling in Asia will be a huge shock. I don’t quite know what to expect however everyone’s telling me the same. They love it and I know I’m ready for the challenge. australia

The worries.

What if it’s so cold? What if it’s too expensive? What if I can’t get work?

These things will always run through your head but remember, Worry is a misuse of imagination.

I’m even further away from home, the furthest possible point for us English across the world.Planet-Earth-picture

The perks. I’ll be back in civilisation, I’ll have more access to home comforts. I’ll see friends I’ve not seen in ages and catch up with ones I’ve made in Asia. Even the little things we become accustomed too in Asia like everyone speaking English, fresh air, routine.

Do I want that yet? I don’t know. We will have to find out.

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Beach front bungalows for $30 US!

The adapting. For me, price is going to be the weirdest. I can get bags of laundry done for £2.50. A taxi across the city for £3. A big meal for £1. Spending AU $8  a night on clean and safe accommodation in beautiful locations. Australia is back to western prices. I have little money and need to make it stretch until I get a job.QUP88wFp

Weather. For those that know Australia, I fly into winter. For Melbourne, where I’m heading, it’s cold. Like coat and scarf kind of cold. I am coming from 35+ degree heat. I have one pair of jeans I bought in Hanoi and a little black hoodie. It’s safe to say, I am not prepared.

Lifestyle. Back to work. Back to paying rent and bills. Finding a new group of friends, and not just for a couple of nights. Hostels in Asia are so sociable and it’s so easy to meet people. I’m moving to a new city, in a new country and it is not Asia.

I luckily have a good friend to stay with and know people that can help me with accommodation while I get on my feet. For those going straight to hostels, they will still be sociable but a totally new environment.

Fundamentally.. So I promised I would do 6 months in Asia, and I did it! With some mental, occasionally physical and definitely financial challenges, I made it. And I’m still in one piece feeling as strong as ever. It’s normal to feel a roller coaster of emotions. Not just coming from Asia but all over the world including England. You know it’ll all work out.

Have a little bit of cash, your visa sorted and a positive mind and it’ll all work out.

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Want to find out what’s been going on since I landed in Australia. Read Part 2 here. (Coming soon).

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My 8 biggest travel tips..

There aren’t really any secrets. No myths or hidden meanings. Taking these things traveling simply entitled me to the best travel..

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1.Give yourself as much time as possible.

I had no end date,  little at home that I had to go back for, other then friends and family of course. I detached myself from most things meaning I had all the time in the world. Literally.

So many travellers do 2/3 months which is sweet but the opportunities you’ll miss out on is crazy.
The less time you have, the more you’ll feel you want to plan. Wanting to fit everything in leads to not letting go as much. My favourite thing is turning up somewhere and staying for however long I feel. I understand we have to make the most with the time we have but try to just go with the flow.

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2. – Don’t plan anything.

Maybe a train ticket or a busy hostel but most things you really don’t have to plan.
It’s great to have some idea of things, especially if your on my own however planning less leaves less room for an adventure of the unknown.

I turn up in cities with no idea where I’m sleeping, I don’t plan most activities and like to get myself ‘lost’. Things and people are popping up in all places, new adventures and random memories will happen if you just go with the flow. Trust me. It works.

3.Don’t expect anything.

I mean nothing. Easier said than done sometimes. I get it, if you’re paying 20 dollars for your own room, you will have expectations of value. It’s a difficult one to grasp, rather then have little expectations, have none.

Let things surprise you, let it blow your mind more then you thought it could.

I feel I grasped this and my satisfaction and experiences have hugely improved. I’m not feeling let down, I’m not wishing it was something else.

I know when something isn’t substantial, I’m not saying settle for something you shouldn’t but in regards to travel, it could be a beach, a hostel, a meal, a tour, an adventure, expect nothing.

4.Stay open minded.

It’s easier said then done.
Try not to close off options or even have too much of an opinion. Stay strong to your beliefs and keep your passions strong but don’t restrict yourself. Embrace the cultures, the traditions, the odd foods and different ways of living. Immerse in different experiences and talk to people from all different backgrounds and countries. It’s part of the fun.

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5.Speak to people.

Okay, Everyone speaks but really go out your way, speak to people from all around the world. Chat to the locals, get to know the staff in your accommodation and of course, all the other backpackers.DSC_3296Made friends with these two little ones in Kampot, Cambodia.

Backpackers are your biggest help while traveling, they offer advice, support and most importantly, tips on where to go and what to do. I never looked at lonely planet. That’s a secret I guess?

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You’ll find most backpackers are chatty, friendly and also want company. Sometimes it’s not what you know but who you know. Hostels are the best places to meet people so get out your comfort zone and just say hello.

6.Don’t ever say what if.

Well, maybe if you’re about to launch yourself of a building.. Not literally, but 90% of the things we do when we travel has some element of risk. Everything we do has risks but travel is here to take us out of our comfort zones.

If I said what if, I’d still be sat in my bedroom in England rather then be in the middle of South East Asia having the time of my life. I’m alive and free and loving every single second.

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– which leads me onto my next one.

7.Enjoy the bad times. You’re having the trip of a lifetime.
I’m doing more things in South East Asia over 6 months then people do in their entire lives, let alone the seasons abroad and other travels however everything doesn’t go perfect. Despite the happy travel photos and wonderful check ins, we do have down days and things arent all sunshine and daisies.

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£3.00 a night for a shared hut on the beach, with no fan but I was living in paradise.

It’s about memories and experiences we make building us passionate personalities.
Even the random long journeys or the stuffy accommodation.

Life isn’t perfect, backpacking isn’t about luxuries. We have to embrace and just enjoy every second. Live in the present. Even when things don’t go to plan or something may not work out, one day you’ll be thinking back to that time and wishing you were back.

Don’t take anything for granted.

8. Life isn’t too short. It’s what you do with it that makes it short.
I’ve just reached my 6 month point and it feels like yesterday I left my home in England and boarded that plane to Bangkok. Time flies when you’re having fun but that’s the thing, for every second you have, you won’t get it back. There are 6o seconds in a minute. 60 minutes in an hour. 24 hours a day. That’s 1440 minutes in 24 hours. Enough with the bullshit. Don’t waste your time away.

8. Say yes as much as possible.

Hold up. Don’t go buying meth from the dodgy Tuk Tuk man or purchasing bloody everything on Khao San. It’s easy to hold back due to finances or avoided situations but sometimes you should try saying yes even when you really don’t feel like it. You never know where it could lead you, who you’ll meet and new oppurtunities.

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A very emotional day volunteering at the KohPhangan Stray Animal Care.

Your travels are the best time of your life.

Enjoy it & embrace it! IMG_9997

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What I want you to know about Travel Photography

The more I travel, the more I build a passion for photography and the more I look at things differently.

“A camera is a save-button for the mind’s eye.%

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5 reasons to travel solo

Traveling isn’t for everyone. Backpacking on your own can be pretty daunting.

There will be times you feel a little lonely or just want someone you know to watch your stuff, give their opinion and look out for you, however these minor little issues are overpowered with the opportunities, skills, lessons and adventures solo travel can give you.

Got sent this that someone took of me without realising. That was one sunset

1. Do what you want. Go where you want. Eat what you want. Sleep where you want. You have no one else you have to worry about.

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2. Most people are solo. I’ve met plenty of travellers in couples, small groups and in tours however 90% of people I come across are doing it all on there own. Lead your own adventure and it’s so much easier to meet people!

Decided to give Thai food a night off and treating ourselves to a pizza and wine night. Beautiful restaurant with fabulous people.

3. Change your mind? Want to travel with people. There is always someone willing to let you join them for some of the trip.

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Thanks to these awesome guys for coming on the trek with me. All staying in the same dorm in the city, we just decided one morning to all go together. A farther and two sons from Hawaii and 5 elephants including a one year old baby running along with us. Glad I shared the experience with such humble and down to earth guys.

Elephant trekking with three Hawaiian firefighters.

I’ve managed to meet people in the strangest of places and looked out for each other, even if it’s just a short boat ride down the Chao river in Bangkok. Even the longer bus and trains there seems to be people I’ve met in hostels and random backpackers and we stick together. Everyone looks after each other in some way!

Sky bar with an English, an ozzie and Dutch. #travel #backpacker #thailand

4. Be yourself. You’ve no one to correct you, prove yourself too, impress. Be real and honest with yourself and everyone around you.

Climbed the waterfalls, smoked a J, drank a beer, slided down the waterfalls with the locals.

5. You will develop certain skills that only traveling by yourself teaches you. Be aware, trust your gut, use your social skills and so many more. Want to know? Find out for yourself.

Had fun with the local children in the hot springs.

 

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The truth about solo travel

Solo travel?

Impossible.

We live in a world with billions of people.

8/10 people are travelling completely alone. Exactly the same as me. One rucksack and a passion to explore. Some for less then a month, and some for as long as they can.

Travelling isn’t something you do. It’s a lifestyle.

When you’re at home preparing for the day you leave, sitting on that plane travelling to the other side of the world with no one but yourself. Reality sinks in, oh shit.

Am I really doing this?

There is a difference between feeling lonely and being alone.

Despite travelling ‘alone’ I’ve not once felt lonely the entire time. If anything, I feel like I’ve made so many brilliant friends and I’m constantly surrounded by outgoing and positive people.

I’ve travelled to different cities with guys I’ve met in my room that morning. I’ve gone trekking through the jungle with someone I met in a coffee shop. I went out with 17 people in Bangkok also solo in my hostel and it felt like we all knew each other for years. I am always with people and if im not, it’s out of choice.

Lady boy cabaret night with the family. #chiangmai #cabaret #hostelliving

There is something about the nature and social side of backpackers, either solo or in a group that is pretty magical. You just start a conversation and everyone is so friendly and open. I’ve met such incredible and interesting people who I get on with so well and the best thing is, i’ll end up seeing them again. Whether it’s some random street in a different city or even in the same dorm in my hostel in a different country. It’s so easy to bump into people in the most random
places.

Traveling isn’t for everyone, especially backpacking. Like I said before, it’s a lifestyle. A way of living. It takes you out of your comfort zone and devolves certain skills you can only gain from doing such trips. Living your life, with all your belongings out of one bag.

The mindset to travel is a different game altogether. You have to overcome the fear of being too shy to say hello. You have to get over the fact you’ll sometimes eat lunch or dinner by yourself. Learn that sleeping in a dorm with 15 other people that may not speak English isn’t too bad. Or where I’m currently writing this blog, on a tiny mini van heading from Pai to Chiang Mai, North Thailand, down a mental twisted and very bumpy 3.5 hour journey squashed in the back with a girl asleep on you isn’t all that bad. So I keep trying to tell myself.

A big one for me is that you learn not to judge. Travelling solo leaves you making new friends with everyone and anyone. It’s quite strange how such an natural feeling for any human being, quite a negative quality 99% of us have, somewhat disappears. Some of us more then others but we all automatically judge. What they wear, their style, the way they walk and talk. It’s natural, we all do it. We try not too and it might not be much of an assumption but part of using are eyes and brains together is ‘judging’ someone else.

Climbed the waterfalls, smoked a J, drank a beer, slided down the waterfalls with the locals.

For me and I can see many others, while travelling solo, let this go. We don’t have time to assume or create an idea of who might be in the bed above or who’s sitting next to you on your train through Vietnam, you’re more interested in their stories, their experiences. Where have they travelled and where to next. You meet them as them, for who they are without all the excess baggage home life can string along.

Some people love being solo and others hate it but one of the best things about travelling on your own is the fact you can do whatever the hell you want. No waiting around, no taking into consideration what everyone else wants to do. As selfish as it sounds, you only have to worry about yourself and when there’s so much to do in such incredible cities it can get pretty frustrating having to wait around and miss out certain things you want to do.

There are downsides to travelling solo however situations people expressed concern about, have not been an issue. Everyone is so friendly that anytime I’ve ever needed help or wanted some kind of advice or answers, someone’s always been there. Don’t get me wrong, I realize it won’t always be like this and I won’t always find helpful people. The disadvantages can sometimes suck, even just asking someone to take a photo or keep an eye on your stuff when you go to the toilet. You just want someone’s second opinion or need some advice from someone you know never the less they are such minor things.

45p to take me to Khao San from the river taxi

Most people travelling are here to have a good time, a fun time, a positive time and a real time.

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Backpacking, alone.

After watching the film ‘Wild’ in the cinema with a friend this evening it really got me thinking.

We are born alone, we die alone and a lot of other things in between. Some spend more time alone than others. Some out of choice, some not.

Me? Well, my parents said I was running off making friends and doing my own things from the age for 5. Chucking myself down water slides on family holidays, still going on roller coasters when others were to scared. Turning up to dance classes alone was never an issue including the classic female one, not caring about going to the toilet alone. I do prefer to be with people but being by myself doesn’t really bother me.

I have always started trips with people but been let down by them leaving. I refused to fly home so carried on alone.

When you travel alone, you’re never truly alone. There is always someone you can talk to, just make it happen.

The one reason I find people love to travel, like myself, is they find themselves. They let their imagination run free, have thoughts and dreams they don’t normally explore into. They are taken out the comfort zone and have new emotions and desires.

Being alone does not make you lonely.

 Sometimes, our mind, is our own worst enemy.




This film ‘Wild’ starring the talented Reece Wetherspoon was not what I expected. Attending a pretty regular weekly cinema routine with a good friend of mine we decided to go for this choice of film. However much it looked fascinating, it was a more of a convenient time showing. Trailer.  Recommend!

It took us on a powerful journey, 
Cheryl, a recovering drug user who
 lost her mother, with a failed marriage, take on an extraordinary 
difficult and ambitious walk. Hiking over 1,000 miles from Mexico to Canada with nothing but her backpack. It showed us the struggles of the challenging journey which
ultimately heals her.

Got me thinking..

I have never done a trip to this extent however it made me think about when I backpacked Europe. I was travelling a continent alone with just the stuff on my back.

My experience was one heck of a journey. A scary, challenging, fun and actually quite relaxing one. It came with some surprising emotions such as anger, doubt,
pleasure, calmness and reassurance. 

Long train journeys, lonely walks around cities, dining out alone and relying purely on your ideas and thoughts took me to places in my mind I had not entered before.

Walking for 8 hours around Budapest,
only had a map, blink 182 playing and
my thoughts.

Energizing, 
Empowering, 
Exhilarating, 
Eventful. 






Travelling alone is different for everyone, it is not for us all. I feel in this day and age we look at being by yourself as a bad thing. Most of us do love a bit of ‘me’ time but many depend on others company to succeed in certain things. I recieved a lot of ”So your travelling a lone!?” Funnily enough, this was from people back at home rather than others I met travelling.

I know many people who will be reading this who live by themselves, or have very independent lifestyles however I am focusing more on travelling. 

Being alone can open doors that being with a friend can’t. It’s not always the case but I have heard from many people that travelling alone leads you to meet more people. In hostels others by themselves want to meet others. I met dozens of people travelling in a group or in a couple, but for those who are tempted to do it alone. Do it. 

There are numerous ways in how to meet people. Offer to go for a drink, join a bar crawl together. I was always being invited to go along with room mates and people I talked to. 

Sometimes, I dropped my bags off and just ask who ever was in my room if they wanted to go grab a drink in the hostel bar or local. This then leads to meeting even more people. On my first night in Rome, everyone spoke to everyone. It was inspirational to see everyone getting on and talking so easily.

Arriving in Italy.
Waiting for train leaving
Florence

It can get lonely. Little things get hard. No one to give their opinion, take a photo for you. Asking them to stay with the bags while you do something.
Just somebody to chat with. 



Your bag

This is all you have. I thought packing a huge suitcase for summer was hard. Sometimes not knowing who your going to meet, types of places you will be visiting or knowing what occasion you will need to dress for. As well as packing cosmetics, products, shoes, documents and personal belonging. This all has to be carried on your back. I am 5’1 so please appreciate I am not the strongest, or tallest. I had to be extra careful what I took. 

The one thing I really want to express is how little you need. For me personally, I value my nice things. I love my good products and straighteners and clean, relatively fashionable clothes. I wanted to take everything, to feel prepared. 

Getting the right bag for you is very important. Spend time researching the correct rucksack and essentials you will need for your trip.

I remember standing up for the first time with my bag on and just falling backwards. I could not even balance. Physically I did not have the power to even stand up, let a lone walk with this bag. What was I thinking!? How the bloody hell was I going to manage. You do get used to it and learn how to balance.

The anger I felt during the trip was actually when I came home…

As happy as I was to see my beautiful friends & family, sleep in my own room in my big double bed, actually sit and watch pointless TV and have a bath.

I was annoyed at myself. Why did I have so much stuff? I walked into my room and was overwhelmed with the things I had. I was happier with a few basic clothes and some mascara and hair mousse. I come back to luxury products I had left behind, numerous pairs of different jeans and knitwear. Heaps of tops and shoes. What was wrong with me?

We all work hard and deserve to have clothes and feel as though if we want something we can aim to get it. I was gone for over a month with nothing but some basic clothes and products and was happy. I was living my life and it was brilliant.

I had felt beforehand that I needed all these things to make me happy. I still have my straighteners and I buy clothes but I have now realised that ‘things’ don’t bring happiness. I now just wear less make up, don’t go shopping anywhere as near as much. 

I feel as though travelling a lone has taught me a lot. How to socialise and communicate with people, to think less and do more which I quite enjoy. It has shown me how to adapt to situations, interact with so many different types of people. Also just how to budget, 

No one is there holding my hand and doing everything for me, I’ve got myself here and that give me such a great sense of achievement. I’ve earnt the money, I’ve planned the trip, I’m living the dream…what more could you ask for?!

– Chris Stevens

Me walking, Patras, Greece.

I would wake up asking where I wanted to go next and what I wanted to do that day, and simply went and did it.

My bed on the Ferry to Italy
Me on the train
First journey, leaving Greece… 6 am




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All you need to know on Interrailing Europe

Inter railing Europe is a fun, convenient and interesting way to travel Europe.

I wanted to do the trip for a while but when planning, everyone I spoke to told me not to plan and this was not helping. What do you mean don’t plan? I just fly somewhere and take it from there?

The answer is yes.

It felt like the pass was almost like paying for freedom. Depending on what type of ticket you get depends on how often you can travel, in which countries and how long its valid for. Prices go from around £50 to £600 and you have to activate it within 3 months of purchasing.

Some tickets depend on the type of trains you can get on. (Regional trains or High speed and first class or economy class). Some tickets are limited to one country, or a section of Europe or a Global Pass which entitles you to go anywhere. I opted for Global. This gets you 10 days travel within 22 days and cost around £250. Travelling pretty much anywhere but just on regional trains in economy class.

Your pass is vital. DO NOT LOOSE IT!

If you do I am afraid there is nothing you can do. Keeping it with your passport and other important documents is a good idea. It will have your details on and this is your life! It is a big paper ticket.

What I adore about inter railing in my opinion, is the fact you travel everywhere by train. No traffic or expensive flights, you hop on the train that suits your needs and go to your desired destination.

The scenic side of things when travelling is a trip in itself. Train journeys can also be long yes, but transport around Europe is not the same as England, it is more comfortable and spacious. The one night train I got from Venice to Vienna felt like something from Harry Potter.. just without all the magic. This is your chance to meet a lot of other travellers. Especially for those wanting to go solo.

Being 5’1 with a very large rucksack was not easy. Walking was the hardest task of the day with my bag on, however I got used to this. I felt as though I had packed light, after the trip, I realised I had not. Packing for a month in one bag with no idea to what your going to be doing is pretty stressful but please make sure you get the correct rucksack for you and pack things you really need!IMG_4437

A piece of advice I heard is that take half of what you think. Gives me chills having to admit it, but this is true. Harder for the lovely ladies but pack sensibly. I cannot stress how little clothes and products you actually need. Later I will tell you what I took and what I felt was not needed. Majority of hostels have laundry rooms to do washing. Your rucksack is on your back a lot and you have to be able to carry it. Those who like to shop, make sure you leave room in your bag for presents or souvenirs. I am just grateful Camden Market in London was my last stop!!

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Hostel living is not something I had really experienced before and I was pretty nervous on what to expect. Sleeping on bunk beds in a room with up to 12 other strangers does not sound the most appealing. Those who think this, your wrong! It’s your chance to meet other people on a similar journey to you.

I met many English travellers but there are people from all over the world! Most hostels have lockers and safes. I was pretty relaxed about having my things out, luckily nothing of mine got taken but I did hear many unfortunate stories so please make sure you are very careful with your belongings. Some might say I’m naive, I am just a bit too trustworthy, finding most people I was staying with were in the same boat as me, travelling alone wanting to explore and to meet people.

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Money. Sure some of you are thinking, hold on a minute, how much does all this cost!? Dining out every night, visiting museums, renting bicycles, numerous pub crawl and day tours, keeping up with laundry, sleeping in hostels every night, endulging on cocktails, hopping on more transport within the city centres. Shopping and accomplishing plenty of tourist attractions. The honest truth is I was just careful. I made sure I knew how much I had to spend, and realising how steady I had to stay with my money.

I personally had just short of £1,000. This included everything I did including days after my inter rail pass- so Amsterdam, transport to London and then London to Leeds. All my food and drink the entire trip. laundry, accommodation, spending money etc. Not my inter rail pass and insurance(That was 20th birthday present while working in Greece) This is what I spent.. not what to take yourself! 

This is all the money I had in my account that I had saved in Malia. I could have spent half and could have spent double. Having no choice but to hold back on certain things was sometimes fustrating as I wanted to go everywhere and do everything but if you take the time out to search for certain student tickets/ Inter rail discounts/ cheap restaurant deals you can save a few euros here and there.

I did not miss out on much but budgeting is part of the trip. Backpacking is not supposed to be luxury. Managing to do almost everything I wanted was something I made sure of.

Walking everywhere became a normal thing to do, cutting out on fizzy drinks at dinner was something I had to do. Just aim for the slightly cheaper places to eat. If you are a little bit like me..naughty and sly there are ways to save money and not pay for transport. Shhhh!

 Hostels in Europe are pretty cheap, certain cities like Paris are more expensive so be aware of the type of city your visiting. Hostels I stayed in ranged from 6 euros to 45 per night. Booking hostels is easy, I would not suggest getting a travel agency to do it for you as they charge you extra.

Here is a video of my journey.